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TTB2036 6

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2011, please make this readble. I fear the damage to the Time Rope isn't fixable. final questions to consider:

 1. What can you do to see your plan realized by 2036? 
 2. Is the future course something we can really control? 

These are some of the things I found that might be relevant to your group projects. Remember: The more you can capture your idea in digital form, the better chance they will reach my time. When you talk to people about it, get some video to distribute. Do something useful with these pages to make it fit your local context (maybe they could be good citations for other articles about Bloomington).

Creating power from water. I bet when I say that you picture a dam or a large turbine being pushed by hundreds of thousands of gallons of water, all rushing at tremendous speeds. It is a cool, and accurate, image of how most power comes from water. That is not to say that it is the only way that power can come from water. http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-03-power.html

More than one billion urban residents will face serious water shortages by 2050 as climate change worsens effects of urbanization, with Indian cities among the worst hit, a study said Monday. http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-03-billion-plus-people-lack.html

Precipitation and runoff in California's major river basin will not fall dramatically with climate change, according to a new federal study that shows rising temperatures will have an uneven effect on the West's water supplies. http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-04-climate-affect-california-precipitation-runoff.html

Nepalese farmers carry hay as they walk through a paddy field in 2009. Himalayan villagers have won the backing of climate science for their suspicions that snow cover, water resources and the ecosystem are changing in their region http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-04-himalayan-farmers-early-pointers-climate.html

Tata Power, subsidiary, of Indian giant Tata Group, has announced a partnership with Sunengy, an Australian company that specializes in Liquid Solar Array (LSA) technology, to build a floating solar array power plant in an as yet to be announced location somewhere in India. http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-03-india-solar-energy-power-video.html

Scientists today claimed one of the milestones in the drive for sustainable energy — development of the first practical artificial leaf. Speaking here at the 241st National Meeting of the American Chemical Society, they described an advanced solar cell the size of a poker card that mimics the process, called photosynthesis, that green plants use to convert sunlight and water into energy. http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-03-debut-artificial-leaf.html

Google's driverless cars (TED) http://blog.ted.com/2011/03/31/googles-driverless-car-sebastian-thrun-on-ted-com An interesting study of commuters in Boston and San Francisco found people are more willing to ride the bus or train when they have tools to manage their commutes effectively. The study asked 18 people to surrender their cars for one week. The participants found that any autonomy lost by handing over their keys could be regained through apps providing real-time information about transit schedules, delays and shops and services along the routes. http://www.wired.com/autopia/2011/04/how-smartphones-can-improve-public-transit

The Purdue Solar Racing team's solar-powered urban commuter car achieved the equivalent of almost 2,200 miles per gallon in the 2011 Shell EcoMarathon international competition http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-04-purdue-students-street-legal-mpg-solar.html

Purdue University civil engineers are working with the Indiana Department of Transportation (INDOT) to perfect the use of recycled concrete for highway construction, a strategy that could reduce material costs by as much as 20 percent. http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-04-concrete-recycling-highway-landfill.html

Today our nation's cities are facing a "perfect storm." For many cities, their populations are growing at the same time that their budgets are shrinking. Today, for the first time, more than 50% of the world's population lives in cities. In the last decade large metropolitan areas in the U.S. grew by a combined 10% - nearly double the rate of the rest of the country. Our large metro areas now house two thirds of America's total population. They have become the dominant forces in our economy and society. http://blogs.hbr.org/revitalizing-cities/2011/04/americas-cities-need-to-get-sm.html

People with a strong moral identity are measurably inspired to do good after being exposed to media stories about uncommon acts of human goodness, according to research at the University of British Columbia’s Sauder School of Business. http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-03-media-uncommon-goodness-good-people.html

According to a new research study, Europeans are happier when they have a day off and work less, while their American counterparts would rather be working those extra hours. Published in the Journal of Happiness Studies, the research, led by Adam Okulicz-Kozaryn from the University of Texas, looks at survey results of Europeans and Americans and how they identified being happy. http://medicalxpress.com/news/2011-04-americans-europeans-happy.html

Reports of sleeping air traffic controllers highlight a long-known and often ignored hazard: Workers on night shifts can have trouble concentrating and even staying awake. http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-04-odd-pose-health.html

Purdue University researchers have developed a set of propagation and production protocols that will help Indiana greenhouse growers bring a tropical plant into flower for spring sales. http://www.physorg.com/news/2011-03-growers-tools-tropical-indiana.html

Thanks to our hosts, Bloomingpedia, for letting us use this space to communicate temporally. Please find one new article about Bloomington you can add to this great local resource each month, starting now.


Puzzle: What do the following words have in common: RED ROSE WORM COTTON BRUSH?

See: Taming the Butterfly, User:Dortheanie, TTB2036 1, TTB2036 2, TTB2036 3, TTB2036 4, TTB2036 5